16. Conserving large mammals

are they a special case?

  1. David W. Macdonald6 and
  2. Katherine J. Willis7
  1. David W. Macdonald1,
  2. Luigi Boitani2,
  3. Eric Dinerstein3,
  4. Hervé Fritz4 and
  5. Richard Wrangham5

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118520178.ch16

Key Topics in Conservation Biology 2

Key Topics in Conservation Biology 2

How to Cite

Macdonald, D. W., Boitani, L., Dinerstein, E., Fritz, H. and Wrangham, R. (2013) Conserving large mammals, in Key Topics in Conservation Biology 2 (eds D. W. Macdonald and K. J. Willis), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118520178.ch16

Editor Information

  1. 6

    Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Tubney House, University of Oxford, UK

  2. 7

    Biodiversity Institute, Oxford Martin School, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, Recanat-Kaplan Centre, Tubney House, University of Oxford, UK

  2. 2

    Department of Biology & Biotechnologies, Università La Sapienza, Viale Università 32, Rome, Italy

  3. 3

    WWF-US, 1250 24th St. NW, Washington, D.C., USA

  4. 4

    Laboratoire Biométrie et Bilogie Evolutive, CNRS UMR 5558, Université de Lyon, Villeurbanne Cedex, France

  5. 5

    Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658765

Online ISBN: 9781118520178

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Keywords:

  • large terrestrial mammals (LTMs);
  • mammal conservation

Summary

Large terrestrial mammals (LTMs) are charismatic and widely valued, and thus potent emblems for conservation. The ecological costs and constraints of being a large mammal in the 21st century create special challenges in their conservation compared to smaller mammalian species. This chapter reviews the conservation problems posed by large body size, among the most important being range collapse – the dramatic reduction in area that LTMs formerly occupied. It probes the reasons why such problems are associated with larger species, and proposes several solutions to increase their chances for persistence and in some cases, lead to recovery of the former range. But while intense threats and slow population growth continue to jeopardize the future of many LTMs, the data reviewed in this chapter also offer hope.