2. Levels of approach

on the appropriate scales for conservation interventions and planning

  1. David W. Macdonald4 and
  2. Katherine J. Willis5
  1. Jonathan E.M. Baillie1,
  2. David Raffaelli2 and
  3. Claudio Sillero-Zubiri3

Published Online: 25 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118520178.ch2

Key Topics in Conservation Biology 2

Key Topics in Conservation Biology 2

How to Cite

Baillie, J. E.M., Raffaelli, D. and Sillero-Zubiri, C. (2013) Levels of approach, in Key Topics in Conservation Biology 2 (eds D. W. Macdonald and K. J. Willis), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118520178.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, Recanati-Kaplan Centre, Tubney House, University of Oxford, UK

  2. 5

    Biodiversity Institute, Oxford Martin School, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Zoological Society of London, London, UK

  2. 2

    Environment Department, University of York, York, UK

  3. 3

    Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, Department of Zoology, Recanati-Kaplan Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 25 FEB 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658765

Online ISBN: 9781118520178

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Keywords:

  • conservation intervention;
  • conservation planning;
  • ecosystems;
  • landscapes;
  • populations;
  • protected areas;
  • species

Summary

This chapter defines the most common scales of conservation intervention, and introduces a number of approaches for conservation planning. It highlights the need for the conservation community to work together to develop a more co-ordinated and inclusive planning process that integrates conservation interventions at a broad range of scales. The chapter introduces four levels of intervention: populations, species, protected areas, and landscapes or ecosystems. Not surprisingly, conservation planning also tends to be at these scales, but national- or global-level planning, such as National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans (NBSAPs), action plans for entire taxonomic groups or sector-based conservation intervention mapping, are increasingly common. It is clear from the case studies in this chapter that interventions at these various scales are not mutually exclusive.