13. Biogas Upgrading

  1. Christian Kennes and
  2. María C. Veiga
  1. M. Estefanía López,
  2. Eldon R. Rene,
  3. María C. Veiga and
  4. Christian Kennes

Published Online: 13 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118523360.ch13

Air Pollution Prevention and Control: Bioreactors and Bioenergy

Air Pollution Prevention and Control: Bioreactors and Bioenergy

How to Cite

López, M. E., Rene, E. R., Veiga, M. C. and Kennes, C. (2013) Biogas Upgrading, in Air Pollution Prevention and Control: Bioreactors and Bioenergy (eds C. Kennes and M. C. Veiga), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118523360.ch13

Editor Information

  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of La Coruña, Spain

Author Information

  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of La Coruña, Spain

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119943310

Online ISBN: 9781118523360

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Keywords:

  • Biofilter;
  • biofuel;
  • carbon dioxide;
  • hydrogen sulphide;
  • mercaptans;
  • methane;
  • siloxanes;
  • upgrading

Summary

Biogas contains a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide and compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), water, and trace amounts of siloxanes, halogenated hydrocarbons, volatile organic and inorganic compounds, mercaptans, and ammonia. Nowadays, there is a growing demand to develop sustainable renewable energy programmes. Biogas is one possible substitute of petroleum-based products. Biogas purification and upgrading can be done by physico-chemical or biological techniques. Biological processes are attractive from an economical and technological view-point, in order to remove most of the undesirable components present in biogas. Several bioreactor configurations have successfully been tested iat laboratory scale and thereafter at the industrial scale for biogas desulfurization. Other bioprocesses suitable for the elimination of mercaptans, nitrogen compounds, carbon dioxide and siloxanes, from biogas, are also reviewed in this chapter. Finally, the existing physico-chemical technologies are also briefly described with their major strengths and weaknesses, and compared with biological techniques.