3. Identification and Characterization of Microbial Communities in Bioreactors

  1. Christian Kennes and
  2. María C. Veiga
  1. Luc Malhautier1,
  2. Léa Cabrol1,2,
  3. Sandrine Bayle1 and
  4. Jean-Louis Fanlo1

Published Online: 13 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118523360.ch3

Air Pollution Prevention and Control: Bioreactors and Bioenergy

Air Pollution Prevention and Control: Bioreactors and Bioenergy

How to Cite

Malhautier, L., Cabrol, L., Bayle, S. and Fanlo, J.-L. (2013) Identification and Characterization of Microbial Communities in Bioreactors, in Air Pollution Prevention and Control: Bioreactors and Bioenergy (eds C. Kennes and M. C. Veiga), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118523360.ch3

Editor Information

  1. Department of Chemical Engineering, University of La Coruña, Spain

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ecole des Mines d'Alès, Laboratoire Génie de l'Environnement Industriel, France

  2. 2

    Escuela de Ingeniería Bioquímica, Chile

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119943310

Online ISBN: 9781118523360

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Keywords:

  • Engineered ecosystems;
  • Microbial ecology;
  • Molecular techniques;
  • Diversity;
  • Community structure;
  • Stability

Summary

Engineered ecosystems are characterized by two components: a biotic component (communities) and a process component (matter and energy flows). Unravelling the biotic/abiotic interactions is a challenging issue that can provide control, diagnostic and prevision tools for process monitoring. Little is known about the microbial communities involved in bioprocesses: how are they influenced by the environmental conditions, and how do they drive the ecosystem function? Nevertheless, the biotic component has been more and more investigated during the last decades, thanks to the rapid development of molecular tools. The first part of this chapter will then focus on current techniques for the characterization of microbial communities in engineered ecosystems. As an example, the second part will highlight some relevant results concerning the biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship.