14. Patient-focused strategies

  1. Richard Grol,
  2. Michel Wensing,
  3. Martin Eccles and
  4. David Davis
  1. Marjan Faber1,
  2. Trudy Weijden van der2,
  3. Glyn Elwyn3,
  4. Michel Wensing1 and
  5. Richard Grol1

Published Online: 28 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch14

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

How to Cite

Faber, M., Weijden, T., Elwyn, G., Wensing, M. and Grol, R. (2013) Patient-focused strategies, in Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition (eds R. Grol, M. Wensing, M. Eccles and D. Davis), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch14

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department IQ healthcare, UMC St Radboud, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

  2. 2

    Department of General Practice, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands

  3. 3

    Centre for Health Sciences Research, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470673386

Online ISBN: 9781118525975

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Keywords:

  • care provider;
  • feedback;
  • healthcare;
  • patient-focused strategies;
  • professional—patient interactions

Summary

This chapter provides an overview of patient-focused strategies in the context of the implementation of innovations in professional—patient interactions. A patient's episode of care forms the basic structure for the presentation of the strategies. Information can be provided to help to make the decisions about whether or not to seek healthcare. After that, information about the quality of care can help the patient in the decision about which care provider to attend. In preparation for the contact with a care provider, practice, or hospital, patients' needs for care can be documented and the patient can be supported and prepared for an active contribution to the clinical encounter. Finally, having received healthcare the patient can provide feedback by means of reporting care experiences, complaints, or comments. This feedback can influence the quality improvement activities of care providers, such as planned changes to service delivery or professional education.