15. Organizational implementation strategies for change

  1. Richard Grol,
  2. Michel Wensing,
  3. Martin Eccles and
  4. David Davis
  1. Michel Wensing,
  2. Miranda Laurant,
  3. Mariëlle Ouwens and
  4. Hub Wollersheim

Published Online: 28 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch15

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

How to Cite

Wensing, M., Laurant, M., Ouwens, M. and Wollersheim, H. (2013) Organizational implementation strategies for change, in Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition (eds R. Grol, M. Wensing, M. Eccles and D. Davis), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch15

Author Information

  1. Department IQ healthcare, UMC St Radboud, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470673386

Online ISBN: 9781118525975

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Keywords:

  • change;
  • integrated care;
  • knowledge management;
  • organizational implementation strategies;
  • patient care teams;
  • professional roles;
  • quality management

Summary

Organizational implementation strategies can focus on the micro-level (at the level of an individual or team revision of professional roles, enhanced patient care teams), the meso-level (at the level of an organization – knowledge management, quality management), or the macro-level (at the level of a health system regulations, reimbursement). This chapter provides an overview of various organizational change strategies and their effects on professional behaviors, costs, and patient outcomes. The emphasis is on organizational changes within existing organizations. Many organizational implementation strategies can influence professional behaviors. There is little research evidence regarding the impact of “quality management” as a broad organizational change strategy. The effects of organizational strategies vary substantially, which may be related to the content of the strategy and to contextual factors. Research has not identified a consistent set of determinants of the effects of organizational implementation strategies.