20. Impact of implementation strategies: controlled studies

  1. Richard Grol,
  2. Michel Wensing,
  3. Martin Eccles and
  4. David Davis
  1. Trudy Weijden van der1,
  2. Martin Eccles2,
  3. Jeremy Grimshaw3,
  4. Marion Campbell4,
  5. Craig Ramsay4 and
  6. Richard Grol5

Published Online: 28 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch20

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

How to Cite

Weijden, T., Eccles, M., Grimshaw, J., Campbell, M., Ramsay, C. and Grol, R. (2013) Impact of implementation strategies: controlled studies, in Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition (eds R. Grol, M. Wensing, M. Eccles and D. Davis), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch20

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of General Practice, University of Maastricht, Maastricht, the Netherlands

  2. 2

    Centre for Health Services Research, School of Population and Health Sciences, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

  3. 3

    Clinical Epidemiology Programme, Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada

  4. 4

    Health Services Research Unit, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK

  5. 5

    Department IQ healthcare, UMC St Radboud, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470673386

Online ISBN: 9781118525975

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Keywords:

  • change implementation strategies;
  • controlled evaluation;
  • quantitative designs;
  • randomized designs

Summary

Quantitative designs should be used within a sequence of evaluation building on preceding theoretical, qualitative, and modeling work. While an uncontrolled evaluation design can generate insight in how far the targeted change has reached, a controlled evaluation design can shed light on the causal relationship between the implementation strategy and the improvement. There are a range of more or less complex randomized designs available for evaluating the effects of implementation projects. This chapter focuses primarily on the setting of research to evaluate the effectiveness of specific quality improvement and implementation strategies where the main aim is to make internally valid statements on their value and generalizability to a wider population or to other settings. A range of research designs and methodological considerations are presented for studies where the researcher has a level of control with regard to the allocation of practices, hospitals, professionals, or patients to experimental or control condition.