7. Quality and safety of care: the role of indicators

  1. Richard Grol,
  2. Michel Wensing,
  3. Martin Eccles and
  4. David Davis
  1. Jozé Braspenning1,
  2. Rosella Hermens1,
  3. Hilly Calsbeek1,
  4. Gert Westert1,
  5. Stephen Campbell2 and
  6. Richard Grol1

Published Online: 28 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch7

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition

How to Cite

Braspenning, J., Hermens, R., Calsbeek, H., Westert, G., Campbell, S. and Grol, R. (2013) Quality and safety of care: the role of indicators, in Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, Second Edition (eds R. Grol, M. Wensing, M. Eccles and D. Davis), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118525975.ch7

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department IQ healthcare, UMC St Radboud, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

  2. 2

    Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 28 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470673386

Online ISBN: 9781118525975

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • consensus methods;
  • healthcare changes;
  • quality indicators;
  • safety

Summary

The measurement of change in healthcare depends on the purpose of the evaluation. There are three distinct purposes: internal quality improvement, external quality measurement, and research. A rigorous and systematic process is needed to develop and test the validity and reliability of quality indicators; different methods are available. Knowledge about the quality and safety of care is a basic step in stimulating changes and improvements in healthcare. This chapter defines the concept of a quality indicator and describes different types and domains of indicators. Consensus methods can be used to generate topics for indicator development. Consensus methods can also be employed when indicators are available from agencies or scientific literature to create broad agreement among the target users. The chapter concludes with examples of the effectiveness of indicator sets in accountability programs, and future developments in defining quality indicators.