6. Oil Modification Processes

  1. Wolf Hamm2,
  2. Richard J. Hamilton3 and
  3. Dr Gijs Calliauw4
  1. Marc Kellens1 and
  2. Dr Gijs Calliauw4

Published Online: 4 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118535202.ch6

Edible Oil Processing, Second Edition

Edible Oil Processing, Second Edition

How to Cite

Kellens, M. and Calliauw, G. (2013) Oil Modification Processes, in Edible Oil Processing, Second Edition (eds W. Hamm, R. J. Hamilton and G. Calliauw), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118535202.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Harpenden, UK

  2. 3

    Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK

  3. 4

    Development Manager Modification, Desmet Ballestra Oils and Fats, Zaventem, Belgium

Author Information

  1. 1

    Group Technical Director, Desmet Ballestra Oils and Fats, Zaventem, Belgium

  2. 4

    Development Manager Modification, Desmet Ballestra Oils and Fats, Zaventem, Belgium

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 4 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 12 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781444336849

Online ISBN: 9781118535202

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • fractionation;
  • hydrogenation;
  • interesterification;
  • oil modification processes

Summary

All oil modification processes involve a substantial change of the physical behaviours and structural properties of an oil. There are three main modification technologies available in the edible oils industry at present: hydrogenation, interesterification and fractionation. In the fractionation discipline, the edible oil industry has turned away from technically superior solvent or detergent fractionation due to safety and investment issues, as well as consumer perceptions. The need for high-quality oil fractions has not ceased, so the combination of these factors has led to a pushing of the boundaries of the most sustainable pathway in this field: the fractional crystallisation of the pure oil, or dry fractionation. Crystalliser designs are evolving towards more sophisticated tanks, with a primary focus on reducing temperature gradients in the bulk.