1. Essential Concepts in Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma

  1. Andrea Donovan MD2 and
  2. Mark Schweitzer MD3
  1. Andrea Donovan

Published Online: 22 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118551691.ch1

Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma: Interpretation and Reporting

Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma: Interpretation and Reporting

How to Cite

Donovan, A. (2012) Essential Concepts in Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma, in Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma: Interpretation and Reporting (eds A. Donovan and M. Schweitzer), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118551691.ch1

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

  2. 3

    Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 DEC 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118158814

Online ISBN: 9781118551691

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Keywords:

  • bone scintigraphy;
  • Computed Tomography (CT);
  • fracture classification;
  • imaging tests;
  • Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging;
  • musculoskeletal trauma;
  • radiographs;
  • radiology report;
  • traumatic injuries;
  • ultrasound

Summary

Traumatic injuries to the musculoskeletal system are extremely common. These injuries are among the short list of medical disorders that may be completely resolved if recognized and appropriately treated. Radiologists have an important role in the diagnosis. In order to identify the abnormality and characterize it correctly, it is essential to be familiar with normal anatomy, protocols for imaging tests, patterns of injury, and implement an organized approach to image interpretation. The American College of Radiology (ACR) devised guidelines for selecting the appropriate imaging test in a patient who sustained musculoskeletal trauma. This chapter deals with different imaging tests, including radiographs, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging, bone scintigraphy and ultrasound. The radiology report needs to be concise, yet include relevant information required for effective clinical management. It is important to be familiar with common fracture classification systems and understand how different grades of injury potentially affect treatment.