5. Elbow and Forearm

  1. Andrea Donovan MD3 and
  2. Mark Schweitzer MD4
  1. Philip Hodnett1 and
  2. Andrea Donovan2

Published Online: 22 OCT 2012

DOI: 10.1002/9781118551691.ch5

Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma: Interpretation and Reporting

Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma: Interpretation and Reporting

How to Cite

Hodnett, P. and Donovan, A. (2012) Elbow and Forearm, in Imaging Musculoskeletal Trauma: Interpretation and Reporting (eds A. Donovan and M. Schweitzer), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118551691.ch5

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

  2. 4

    Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Radiology, Limerick University Hospital, Ireland

  2. 2

    Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 22 OCT 2012
  2. Published Print: 10 DEC 2012

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118158814

Online ISBN: 9781118551691

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Keywords:

  • dislocation;
  • distal humerus;
  • elbow trauma;
  • forearm fractures;
  • imaging tests;
  • neck fracture;
  • olecranon fractures;
  • radial head fracture

Summary

The elbow is composed of three articulations contained within a single, synovial-lined joint cavity (humeroulnar, radiohumeral, and radioulnar joints). Distal humeral fractures occur in either young patients following high-energy trauma or elderly female patients with osteoporosis. Radial head or neck fractures are the most common adult elbow fractures and account for one-half of adult elbow injuries. Direct high-energy injuries to the flexed elbow may produce comminuted olecranon fractures often complicated by open wounds, elbow dislocation, radial head fracture or dislocation, and elbow instability. Most elbow dislocations result from a fall onto an outstretched hand, motor vehicle collisions or other high-energy trauma, delivered directly to the elbow. Forearm fractures are commonly associated with injury at the wrist or elbow. The initial imaging exam in elbow trauma is the standard elbow series consisting of AP and lateral views.