2. Role of Metal Ions in Brain Function, Metal Transport, Storage and Homoeostasis

  1. Robert Crichton and
  2. Roberta Ward

Published Online: 6 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118553480.ch02

Metal-based Neurodegeneration: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Strategies

Metal-based Neurodegeneration: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Strategies

How to Cite

Crichton, R. and Ward, R. (eds) (2013) Role of Metal Ions in Brain Function, Metal Transport, Storage and Homoeostasis, in Metal-based Neurodegeneration: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Strategies, John Wiley and Sons Ltd, Chichester, United Kingdom. doi: 10.1002/9781118553480.ch02

Editor Information

  1. Unit of Biochemistry, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 SEP 2013
  2. Published Print: 25 OCT 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119977148

Online ISBN: 9781118553480

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Keywords:

  • brain function;
  • calcium;
  • copper;
  • homoeostasis;
  • iron;
  • metal transport;
  • potassium;
  • signal transduction;
  • sodium;
  • zinc

Summary

In order to fulfill a series of important functions such as energy production, nerve transmission, muscle contraction and oxygen transport, metal ions are absolutely essential. They include the alkali and alkaline earth metals potassium, sodium and calcium together with the transition metals copper, iron, and zinc. These metal ions are particularly important for brain function, and the term metalloneurochemistry has been proposed to describe the study of metal ions in the brain and the nervous system at the molecular level. This chapter discusses the role of these metal ions in brain function, metal transport, storage and homoeostasis. Transport across membranes is carried out by two classes of membrane proteins, channels and pumps. Fluxes of calcium ions play an important role in signal transduction.