2. Prevailing Policies versus New Tailored Policies

  1. Sako Musterd3 and
  2. Zoltán Kovács4
  1. Sako Musterd1 and
  2. Zoltán Kovács2

Published Online: 5 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch2

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

How to Cite

Musterd, S. and Kovács, Z. (2013) Prevailing Policies versus New Tailored Policies, in Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities (eds S. Musterd and Z. Kovács), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Centre for Urban Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  2. 4

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Author Information

  1. 1

    Centre for Urban Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  2. 2

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470675038

Online ISBN: 9781118554579

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Keywords:

  • economic theory;
  • ‘classic’ location theory;
  • cluster theory;
  • soft conditions theory;
  • personal networks

Summary

Policy-makers usually give much weight to specialist intermediaries, gurus, who propose ideas about how to intervene in the urban economy. The problem is that there is a tendency for policy-makers to celebrate the most popular gurus, who then set the tone for converging urban economic policies; while the value of the new policy direction is hardly or not at all supported by proper analysis of the condition and potential of the local or regional economy under consideration. Because it would be wise for policy-makers to incorporate all available knowledge, this chapter presents some of the insights derived from the literature on urban economic development and the conditions that are of key importance. The literature on prevailing policies and new tailored policies is considered, providing the framework for the discussions in the following three parts of this volume, which are briefly introduced in turn.