4. Policies towards Multi-Layered Cities and Cluster Development

  1. Sako Musterd4 and
  2. Zoltán Kovács5
  1. Tamás Egedy1,
  2. Anne von Streit2 and
  3. Marco Bontje3

Published Online: 5 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch4

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

How to Cite

Egedy, T., von Streit, A. and Bontje, M. (2013) Policies towards Multi-Layered Cities and Cluster Development, in Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities (eds S. Musterd and Z. Kovács), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch4

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Centre for Urban Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  2. 5

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

  2. 2

    Department of Geography, University of Munich (LMU), Germany

  3. 3

    Department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470675038

Online ISBN: 9781118554579

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Keywords:

  • single-layered cities;
  • multi-layered cities;
  • clusters;
  • path dependence

Summary

City-regions that were built on a series of historical ‘layers’ have different economic potentials than those where only one or a few layers dominate the scene. These layers may, for example, be economic or social, or different physical structures from the past, or combinations of them. Single-layered cities (such as company towns that relied on coal or steel production) are more vulnerable to structural economic change and more exposed to short-term booms and busts than cities with greater diversity and variety. Therefore, strategic urban economic policies may aim to increase the number of layers, in order to slowly enter into a position in which there are ‘fall-back’ options in times of radical economic transformation. When multiple layers are already in place, policy-makers would be wise to avoid destroying them. This chapter shows how important it is for policy-makers to recognise their own blend of structures and layers.