6. Addressing the Legacy of Post-Socialist Cities in East Central Europe

  1. Sako Musterd5 and
  2. Zoltán Kovács6
  1. Tadeusz Stryjakiewicz1,
  2. Olga Gritsai2,
  3. Evgenii Dainov3 and
  4. Tamás Egedy4

Published Online: 5 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch6

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

How to Cite

Stryjakiewicz, T., Gritsai, O., Dainov, E. and Egedy, T. (2013) Addressing the Legacy of Post-Socialist Cities in East Central Europe, in Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities (eds S. Musterd and Z. Kovács), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch6

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Centre for Urban Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  2. 6

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Socio-Economic Geography and Spatial Management, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland

  2. 2

    Department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  3. 3

    Centre for Social Practices, New Bulgarian University, Sofia, Bulgaria

  4. 4

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470675038

Online ISBN: 9781118554579

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Keywords:

  • post-socialist cities;
  • urban transformation;
  • urban policies;
  • creative and knowledge-intensive industries;
  • East Central Europe

Summary

This chapter addresses the specificity of the development of the creative and knowledge-intensive industries in the post-socialist cities of East Central Europe (ECE) and consequences for policy development. Because of the distinctive pathways of these city-regions, it would be unwise and in fact impossible to copy Western European policies. This chapter shows, however, that there is scope for differentiated policies. It is argued that, in the post-socialist cities of East Central Europe, urban policies should be even more ‘tailored’ than those in Western Europe because of bigger differences in both socio-economic performance and institutional settings. City-regions should identify their strengths and weaknesses, and they should take advantage of their strongest assets and not to rely upon weaker ones.