9. Urban Regeneration and Housing as Potential Tools for Enhancing the Creative Economy

  1. Sako Musterd4 and
  2. Zoltán Kovács5
  1. Tamás Egedy1,
  2. Declan Redmond2 and
  3. Kornelia Ehrlich3

Published Online: 5 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch9

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities

How to Cite

Egedy, T., Redmond, D. and Ehrlich, K. (2013) Urban Regeneration and Housing as Potential Tools for Enhancing the Creative Economy, in Place-making and Policies for Competitive Cities (eds S. Musterd and Z. Kovács), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118554579.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Centre for Urban Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

  2. 5

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Geography, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary

  2. 2

    School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin, Ireland

  3. 3

    Leibniz-Institute for Regional Geography, Leipzig, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 5 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 28 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470675038

Online ISBN: 9781118554579

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Keywords:

  • housing;
  • urban regeneration;
  • creative knowledge economy;
  • Western Europe;
  • Eastern Europe;
  • Central Europe

Summary

Nowadays, housing and urban regeneration policies are becoming crucial to ensuring that the locations in any city are ‘top quality’ and distinctively attractive. This is also essential for the residential profile of the city and its region. Not only the character and functioning of the housing market, and the match between demand and supply, but also the quality of the built environment, the distinctive architecture, the urban layout and the state of environmental conditions in general are important in distinguishing one city-region from others. Diversified neighbourhoods and well-functioning housing markets can be attractive for people working in the creative knowledge economy. This implies that it may be necessary to develop tailored housing and urban renewal policies to ensure attractiveness.