18. Nanocomputers

  1. Max More and
  2. Natasha Vita-More
  1. J. Storrs Hall

Published Online: 11 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118555927.ch18

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

How to Cite

Storrs Hall, J. (2013) Nanocomputers, in The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future (eds M. More and N. Vita-More), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118555927.ch18

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 29 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118334294

Online ISBN: 9781118555927

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Keywords:

  • computer principles;
  • Drexler's mechanical rod-logic design;
  • entropy;
  • human body;
  • memory;
  • motors;
  • nanocomputers;
  • nanotechnology;
  • registers

Summary

Beyond providing robots with the processing power humans already have, there is the opportunity of extending those powers themselves. Nanocomputers represent enough power in little enough space that it would make sense to implant them in your head to extend your sensorium, augment your memory, sharpen your reasoning. About a year ago the author had the occasion to design a nanocomputer using Eric Drexler's mechanical rod logic. In Drexler's rod-logic design, all the bit-erasing functionality is concentrated in the registers. The register design is fairly complex, to keep the energy dissipated in this process near its theoretical minimum. Memory can be implemented as lots of registers. In order to drive all this mechanical logic we need a motor of some kind; Drexler has designed an electric motor. The speed advantage of electronics over mechanical logic is almost certain to drive the descent into nanocomputer design.