39. Trans and Post

  1. Max More and
  2. Natasha Vita-More
  1. Damien Broderick

Published Online: 11 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118555927.ch39

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

How to Cite

Broderick, D. (2013) Trans and Post, in The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future (eds M. More and N. Vita-More), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118555927.ch39

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 29 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118334294

Online ISBN: 9781118555927

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Keywords:

  • death;
  • genes;
  • posthuman;
  • science;
  • technologies;
  • transhuman;
  • transhumanism

Summary

Probably the thunderously converging technologies will comprise an ever-steepening escalator of radical change. From early transhuman adoption of patches and revamps for our luckless fatal condition, we might shift to a genuinely posthuman state where augmented people meet or perhaps blend with AI minds still in the early stages of development. Stigmatizing the posthuman before they arrive, and the transhumanists already here, is hardly the wisest choice, nor the most humane. The true goal of transhumanism is the defeat of aging and death. Geneticists have extended the lifespan of at least some living creatures, such as nematode worms, allowing them to live as much as seven times longer than their unmodified kin. This is not yet the abolition of death – but it looks very much like the first step toward that goal.