40. Back to Nature II

Art and Technology in the Twenty-First Century

  1. Max More and
  2. Natasha Vita-More
  1. Roy Ascott

Published Online: 11 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118555927.ch40

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

How to Cite

Ascott, R. (2013) Back to Nature II, in The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future (eds M. More and N. Vita-More), John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118555927.ch40

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 29 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118334294

Online ISBN: 9781118555927

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Keywords:

  • art;
  • cultural shift;
  • electronic space;
  • environment;
  • molecular time;
  • nature;
  • painting;
  • technologies;
  • twenty-first century;
  • virtualization

Summary

It may seem paradoxical to the popular view of art's relationship to nature, but it is these technological and computerized systems which are providing us with a threshold into the natural world whereas landscape and figure painting have kept us separated from it. How is it that the most advanced technologies, electronic and molecular, the very epitome of the artificial, could bring us back to nature? For that is what the author proposes. The author suggests that the logical outcome of our working in electronic space is to redefine our living in natural space. In the art of the telematic culture set in electronic space, artists are no longer concerned with either with magic or representation but with virtualization. The question of the transformation of the self within electronic space and molecular time will dominate the art of the next century.