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V. Engines of Life

Identity and Beyond Death

  1. Max More and
  2. Natasha Vita-More

Published Online: 11 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118555927.part5

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

How to Cite

More, M. and Vita-More, N. (eds) (2013) Engines of Life, in The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future, John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118555927.part5

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 29 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118334294

Online ISBN: 9781118555927

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Keywords:

  • death;
  • human life;
  • personal identity;
  • transhumanism

Summary

This chapter provides a glimpse of what the fifth section of The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future talks about. The essays in this section address varied aspects and implications of radically extended lifespans. Today's practice of cryopreservation (or “cryonics”) involves preserving people immediately after declaration of legal death then maintaining them in an unchanging state for as long as it will take to deliver them into a future able to repair biological damage and revive them. Although cryopreservation cannot yet be reversed, death has not occurred unless biochemistry becomes irreversibly damaged. A crucial insight is that irreversibility depends on the level of technology. Finally, the part considers the future technological possibilities for resurrection of the dead by means of uploading, and of synthetic, non-physical realities in which we and the resurrected dead may live.