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IX. The World's Most Dangerous Idea

  1. Max More and
  2. Natasha Vita-More

Published Online: 11 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118555927.part9

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future

How to Cite

More, M. and Vita-More, N. (eds) (2013) The World's Most Dangerous Idea, in The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future, John Wiley & Sons, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118555927.part9

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 11 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 29 APR 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118334294

Online ISBN: 9781118555927

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Keywords:

  • self-applied technology;
  • transhumanism

Summary

This chapter provides a glimpse of the themes covered in the ninth section of The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future. In a widely cited 2004 article in Foreign Policy, Francis Fukuyama described transhumanism as “the most dangerous idea in the world.” Fukuyama quickly decides that the offerings of self-applied technology “come at a frightful moral cost.” The section addresses this and related fears and engages the growing critical discussion. Damien Broderick tackles Fukuyama’s worries about the biotechnological revolution in his essay, “Trans and Post.” In identifying a core goal of transhumanism as the defeat of aging and death, Broderick asks whether such a transhumanist victory over decay would be wicked or a boon. In his essay “The Great Transition: Ideas and Anxieties,” writer, philosopher, and critic Blackford critiques Don Ihde's and Ted Peters' warnings about evolution and human nature.