15. The three C's of consultation

  1. Beth S. Brodsky PhD Associate Clinical Professor of Medical Psychology1 and
  2. Barbara Stanley PhD Professor of Clinical Psychology2

Published Online: 6 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118556603.ch15

The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Primer: How DBT Can Inform Clinical Practice

The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Primer: How DBT Can Inform Clinical Practice

How to Cite

Brodsky, B. S. and Stanley, B. (2013) The three C's of consultation, in The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Primer: How DBT Can Inform Clinical Practice, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118556603.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Research Scientist New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Research Scientist New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 MAY 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119968931

Online ISBN: 9781118556603

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Keywords:

  • consultation;
  • splitting;
  • multiple treatments;
  • treatment team

Summary

Due to the complex nature of the borderline personality disorder (BPD) disorder and its presenting symptomatology, there is often a need for multiple treatment modalities, resulting in the involvement of numerous mental health clinicians providing care for one patient. Thus, clinicians treating individuals with BPD rarely function in isolation. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) practitioners consult with DBT colleagues, consult to their patient, and consult with other clinicians. This chapter reviews concepts and guidelines for peer consultation and support, for coaching patients to advocate for themselves with multiple care providers, and collaboration with other members of an outpatient “treatment team.” This chapter also addresses the phenomenon of “splitting” and how it is understood and approached from a DBT perspective. As in other DBT interventions, these concepts are informed by a dialectic approach.