5. Understanding and treating self-harm behaviors in BPD

  1. Beth S. Brodsky PhD Associate Clinical Professor of Medical Psychology1 and
  2. Barbara Stanley PhD Professor of Clinical Psychology2

Published Online: 6 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118556603.ch5

The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Primer: How DBT Can Inform Clinical Practice

The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Primer: How DBT Can Inform Clinical Practice

How to Cite

Brodsky, B. S. and Stanley, B. (2013) Understanding and treating self-harm behaviors in BPD, in The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Primer: How DBT Can Inform Clinical Practice, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118556603.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Research Scientist New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA

  2. 2

    Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Research Scientist New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 6 MAY 2013
  2. Published Print: 15 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119968931

Online ISBN: 9781118556603

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Keywords:

  • suicidal behavior;
  • nonsuicidal self-injury;
  • borderline personality disorder;
  • psychotherapy

Summary

Suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injurious behaviors present tremendous challenges for the clinician in treating borderline personality disorder. The difficulty in predicting risk and reducing these behaviors, and in distinguishing between suicidal and nonsuicidal self-harm, creates confusion and anxiety for clinician and patient alike. In this chapter, we present a comprehensive review of what is currently known regarding the emotional and physical experience of individuals with borderline personality disorder who intentionally harm themselves, either by attempting suicide or engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury. We then describe a dialectical behavior therapy-informed formulation regarding how to more effectively intervene toward the prediction, prevention, reduction, and eventual elimination of these behaviors.