14. Neurophenomenology: Enhancing the Experimental and Cross-Cultural Study of Brain and Experience

  1. Harris L. Friedman1 and
  2. Glenn Hartelius2
  1. Charles D. Laughlin and
  2. Adam J. Rock

Published Online: 9 AUG 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118591277.ch14

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Transpersonal Psychology

The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Transpersonal Psychology

How to Cite

Laughlin, C. D. and Rock, A. J. (2013) Neurophenomenology: Enhancing the Experimental and Cross-Cultural Study of Brain and Experience, in The Wiley-Blackwell Handbook of Transpersonal Psychology (eds H. L. Friedman and G. Hartelius), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118591277.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 1

    University of Florida

  2. 2

    Sofia University, Palo Alto, CA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 AUG 2013
  2. Published Print: 18 AUG 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119967552

Online ISBN: 9781118591277

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Keywords:

  • brain;
  • cognitive neurophenomenologists;
  • consciousness;
  • cultural neurophenomenologists;
  • neurophenomenology

Summary

Every thought, image, feeling, intuition, awareness and sensory experience is mediated by the organ of experience—the brain. This chapter discusses the concepts of consciousness and phenomenology, and goes on to talk about the origin and meaning of the concept of neurophenomenology. It focuses on “study of experience” and examines the natural biological basis of lived experience. The chapter explores the range of problems that might profitably come within the purview of a neurophenomenological analysis. For cognitive neurophenomenology, the implications are radical, in that the approach requires considerable alteration in the design of laboratory or clinical research protocols. For cultural neurophenomenologists, the challenge is to acquire the requisite training in neuroscience (or add a neuroscientist to the team) as well as learn to use transpersonal field methods to access the experiences had by one's non-Western hosts while in alternative states of consciousness.