33. Gothic Self-Fashioning in Gibson's Novels: Nature, Culture, Identity, Improvisation, and Cyberspace

  1. Charles L. Crow
  1. John Whatley

Published Online: 13 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118608395.ch33

A Companion to American Gothic

A Companion to American Gothic

How to Cite

Whatley, J. (2013) Gothic Self-Fashioning in Gibson's Novels: Nature, Culture, Identity, Improvisation, and Cyberspace, in A Companion to American Gothic (ed C. L. Crow), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118608395.ch33

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 SEP 2013
  2. Published Print: 25 NOV 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470671870

Online ISBN: 9781118608395

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Keywords:

  • Gothic Science Fiction;
  • Cyberspace;
  • Dystopian;
  • Collage;
  • Cubism

Summary

Reviewing a collection of essays on a conference proceeding “Fiction 2000: Cyberpunk and the Future of Narrative,” Rob Latham sees Neuromancer as Gibson's focal text and compliments “The novel's formal and thematic complexity, its openness to diverse and often conflicting modes of interpretation, and its sheer power to capture the critical imagination” (266 Science Fiction Studies, 1993, Volume 20). The following article explores three aspects of Gibson's early Sprawl Trilogy in order to uncover his relation to the gothic modes: the remediation of nature and space in cyberspace, the reset of culture, and lastly the deconstructions of character as self-fashioning. Uncovering the nature of “cyberspace,” the imaginative projections of postmodern cyber culture , and the new power of improvisation of self in Gibson's vision reveals a problematic connection to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and a dystopian, gothic vision of what we and our web are becoming.