16. Nanocatalysts for Biofuels

  1. Vivek Polshettiwar5 and
  2. Tewodros Asefa6
  1. Vitaliy Budarin1,
  2. Peter S. Shuttleworth2,
  3. Brigid Lanigan3 and
  4. James H. Clark4

Published Online: 13 SEP 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118609811.ch16

Nanocatalysis Synthesis and Applications

Nanocatalysis Synthesis and Applications

How to Cite

Budarin, V., Shuttleworth, P. S., Lanigan, B. and Clark, J. H. (2013) Nanocatalysts for Biofuels, in Nanocatalysis Synthesis and Applications (eds V. Polshettiwar and T. Asefa), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118609811.ch16

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Nanocatalysis Laboratory Department of Chemical Sciences Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Colaba, Mumbai, India

  2. 6

    Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering The Rutgers Catalysis Research Center (RCRC) Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Piscataway, NJ, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Chemistry, Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, York, UK

  2. 2

    Departamento de Física de Polímeros, Elastómeros y Aplicaciones Energéticas, Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, CSIC, Madrid, Spain

  3. 3

    Department of Chemistry, Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, York, UK

  4. 4

    Department of Chemistry, Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, Heslington, York, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 13 SEP 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 AUG 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118148860

Online ISBN: 9781118609811

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Keywords:

  • biofuel;
  • biomass;
  • nanocatalysts

Summary

Nanocatalysts are showing a great promise in biofuel production, leading to greener processing steps, higher yields of desired products, and ultimately more economically favorable conditions to be cost-competitive with crude oil alternatives. There are four main types of gases released by human activity-carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and the halocarbons-all of which accumulate in the Earth's atmosphere and contribute to the global warming and climate change. The most extended biomass pretreatment methods are generally divided into two categories—biochemical and thermochemical processes. Examples of biochemical processing involve the conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars for the production of specific alcohols fuels such as ethanol and butanol. Biomass feedstock can be converted into four major types of liquid fuels namely biodiesel, bioethanol, and bio-oil and Fischer—Tropsch diesel. Biodiesel and bioethanol are the most extended alternative transport fuels.