11. Morphological and Thermal Investigations of Starch-Based Nanocomposites

  1. Alain Dufresne1,
  2. Sabu Thomas2 and
  3. Laly A. Pothen3
  1. Peter R. Chang,
  2. Jin Huang,
  3. Qing Huang and
  4. Debbie P. Anderson

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118609958.ch11

Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications

Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications

How to Cite

Chang, P. R., Huang, J., Huang, Q. and Anderson, D. P. (2013) Morphological and Thermal Investigations of Starch-Based Nanocomposites, in Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications (eds A. Dufresne, S. Thomas and L. A. Pothen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118609958.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Grenoble Institute of Technology (Grenoble INP), The International School of Paper, Print Media, and Biomaterials (Pagora), Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France

  2. 2

    School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, India

  3. 3

    Department of Chemistry, Bishop Moore College, Mavelikara, Kerala, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 23 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118218358

Online ISBN: 9781118609958

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Keywords:

  • fracture morphologies;
  • nanofillers;
  • starch‐based nanocomposites;
  • thermal behavior

Summary

This chapter details morphologies and thermal behaviors of starch‐based nanocomposites, as well as their application. It discusses the preparation methods, crystalline structures, and reinforcement mechanisms of various nanofillers in starch based nanocomposites. Dispersibility of nanofillers depends on factors such as shape, size, concentration in the starch matrix, functional groups on the nanofiller surface, and the mechanism of interactions between nanofiller and matrix. The chapter discusses the dispersibility of different nanofillers. The main components of thermal behavior of starch‐based nanocomposites include glass transition and thermal decomposition. Glass transition is often characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), with which the glass transition temperature (Tg) can be determined. Thermal decomposition is determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG). Finally, the chapter presents the prospects and outlook for application in nanomaterials and biomaterials.