24. Preparation, Processing and Applications of Protein Nanofibers

  1. Alain Dufresne1,
  2. Sabu Thomas2 and
  3. Laly A. Pothen3
  1. Megan Garvey,
  2. Madhusudan Vasudevamurthy,
  3. Shiva P. Rao,
  4. Heath Ecroyd,
  5. Juliet A. Gerrard and
  6. John A. Carver

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118609958.ch24

Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications

Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications

How to Cite

Garvey, M., Vasudevamurthy, M., Rao, S. P., Ecroyd, H., Gerrard, J. A. and Carver, J. A. (2013) Preparation, Processing and Applications of Protein Nanofibers, in Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications (eds A. Dufresne, S. Thomas and L. A. Pothen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118609958.ch24

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Grenoble Institute of Technology (Grenoble INP), The International School of Paper, Print Media, and Biomaterials (Pagora), Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France

  2. 2

    School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, India

  3. 3

    Department of Chemistry, Bishop Moore College, Mavelikara, Kerala, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 23 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118218358

Online ISBN: 9781118609958

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Keywords:

  • bionanomaterials;
  • enzymatic activity;
  • enzyme immobilization;
  • insulin;
  • lens crystallin proteins;
  • protein nanofibers

Summary

This chapter focuses on the production, characterization, and applications of protein nanofiber structures formed from a variety of peptides and proteins. Protein nanofibers, because of their almost unequalled aspect ratio (i.e., their ratio of diameter to length), have great potential in the field of templated one‐dimensional objects such as conducting nanowires. The chapter deals with the preparation and processing of protein nanofibers formed from lens crystallin proteins and insulin. The use of protein nanofibers as novel bionanomaterials is one of the most promising of all potential applications. The ability to functionalize protein nanofibers, by enzyme immobilization, makes them one of the most attractive nanomaterials for various applications that utilize enzymatic activity. The practical use of protein nanofibers in bionanotechnology is gaining in popularity, primarily due to their qualities such as self‐assembly and their ability to be readily functionalized.