3. Chemical Modification of Chitosan and Its Biomedical Application

  1. Alain Dufresne1,
  2. Sabu Thomas2 and
  3. Laly A. Pothen3
  1. Deepa Thomas and
  2. Sabu Thomas

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118609958.ch3

Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications

Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications

How to Cite

Thomas, D. and Thomas, S. (2013) Chemical Modification of Chitosan and Its Biomedical Application, in Biopolymer Nanocomposites: Processing, Properties, and Applications (eds A. Dufresne, S. Thomas and L. A. Pothen), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118609958.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 1

    Grenoble Institute of Technology (Grenoble INP), The International School of Paper, Print Media, and Biomaterials (Pagora), Saint Martin d'Hères Cedex, France

  2. 2

    School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, India

  3. 3

    Department of Chemistry, Bishop Moore College, Mavelikara, Kerala, India

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 23 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118218358

Online ISBN: 9781118609958

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Keywords:

  • chemical modification;
  • chitosan;
  • drug delivery;
  • grafting;
  • tissue engineering;
  • wound healing

Summary

An elegant way to improve or to impart new properties to chitosan is the chemical modification of the chain, generally by grafting of functional groups, without modification of the initial skeleton in order to preserve the original properties. Chitosan chains possess three attractive reactive sites for chemical modification: two hydroxyl groups and one primary amine. This chapter reviews the main chemical modifications of chitosan. It presents the recent and relevant examples of the distinct applications, with particular emphasis on tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. Chitosan and its derivatives are suitable for tissue engineering applications because of their porous structure, gel‐forming properties, ease of chemical modification, biodegradability, biocompatibility, antibacterial activity, and high affinity to in vivo macromolecules.