2. Porous Hydrothermal Carbons

  1. MARIA-MAGDALENA TITIRICI
  1. Robin J. White1,
  2. Tim-Patrick Fellinger2,
  3. Shiori Kubo3,
  4. Nicolas Brun2 and
  5. Maria-Magdalena Titirici4

Published Online: 9 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118622179.ch2

Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes

Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes

How to Cite

White, R. J., Fellinger, T.-P., Kubo, S., Brun, N. and Titirici, M.-M. (2013) Porous Hydrothermal Carbons, in Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes (ed M.-M. TITIRICI), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118622179.ch2

Editor Information

  1. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Earth, Energy and Environment Cluster, Germany

  2. 2

    Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Germany

  3. 3

    Absorption and Decomposition Technology Research Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan

  4. 4

    School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119975397

Online ISBN: 9781118622179

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Keywords:

  • carbon aerogels;
  • HTC-derived carbogels;
  • pore morphology control;
  • porous hydrothermal carbonization (HTC)

Summary

This chapter focuses on the development of synthetic routes to introduce well-defined porosity into hydrothermal carbons. It introduces and discusses various synthetic routes towards porous hydrothermal carbonization (HTC)-derived materials or composites, focusing on the synthesis of different pore systems and morphologies directed by the presence of various structure-directing agents. Attention is given to the utilization of naturally occurring biocomposites and their use in the preparation of porous HTC-derived materials. The methods presented in the chapter allow tailoring of the final structure via the tools of colloid and polymer science, leading to selectable material morphology for a wide range of applications. Aerogels are known in a great variety of compositions and are used in numerous high-end applications, including chromatography, adsorption, separation, gas storage, detectors, heat insulation, and as supports and ion exchange materials.