3. Porous Biomass-Derived Carbons: Activated Carbons

  1. MARIA-MAGDALENA TITIRICI
  1. Lozano-Castell Dolores1,
  2. Pablo Marco-Lozar Juan1,
  3. Camillo Falco2,
  4. Maria-Magdalena Titirici3 and
  5. Cazorla-Amorós Diego1

Published Online: 9 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118622179.ch3

Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes

Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes

How to Cite

Dolores, L.-C., Juan, P. M.-L., Falco, C., Titirici, M.-M. and Diego, C.-A. (2013) Porous Biomass-Derived Carbons: Activated Carbons, in Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes (ed M.-M. TITIRICI), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118622179.ch3

Editor Information

  1. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    Materials Institute and Inorganic Chemistry Department, Universidad de Alicante, Spain

  2. 2

    Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies, Earth, Energy and Environment Cluster, Germany

  3. 3

    School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119975397

Online ISBN: 9781118622179

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Keywords:

  • activated carbons;
  • hydrothermal carbonization (HTC);
  • lignocellulosic biomass;
  • microporosity

Summary

This chapter deals with the production of activated carbons with a highly developed microporosity from lignocellulosic biomass. Two different synthetic routes are covered: (i) carbonization followed by (or together with) chemical activation with H3PO4, ZnCl2, and KOH/NaOH, and (ii) hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of biomass followed by chemical activation with KOH/NaOH. The chapter focuses on some results obtained in a broad study carried out in the laboratories with several types of hydrochar products and different activation conditions. The examples selected for the chapter correspond to three types of hydrochar products obtained from saccharides (glucose and cellulose) and biomass (rye straw), which have been hydrothermally treated at the same temperature (240°C) and, afterwards, activated using KOH.