7. Applications of Hydrothermal Carbon in Modern Nanotechnology

  1. MARIA-MAGDALENA TITIRICI
  1. Marta Sevilla1,
  2. Antonio B. Fuertes1,
  3. Demir-Cakan Rezan2 and
  4. Maria-Magdalena Titirici3

Published Online: 9 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118622179.ch7

Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes

Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes

How to Cite

Sevilla, M., Fuertes, A. B., Rezan, D.-C. and Titirici, M.-M. (2013) Applications of Hydrothermal Carbon in Modern Nanotechnology, in Sustainable Carbon Materials from Hydrothermal Processes (ed M.-M. TITIRICI), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118622179.ch7

Editor Information

  1. School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Author Information

  1. 1

    National Council for Scienti.c Research (CSIC), Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), Spain

  2. 2

    Department of Chemical Engineering, Gebze Institute of Technology, Turkey

  3. 3

    School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 9 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781119975397

Online ISBN: 9781118622179

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Keywords:

  • energy storage;
  • gas storage;
  • hydrothermal carbonization (HTC);
  • nanotechnology;
  • photocatalysis;
  • water purification

Summary

Recent years have witnessed unprecedented growth in research and applications in the area of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This chapter shows that hydrothermal carbonization (HTC)-derived materials have already been used in a plethora of very important applications ranging from renewable energy to catalysis, photocatalysis, gas storage, water purification, sensing, and medicine. So far, mainly pure carbohydrates have been employed as precursors for the synthesis of such highly functional materials. Heteroatom-doped carbon materials continue to play an important role, especially in fields such as adsorption, electrocatalysis, and energy storage. HTC-based hybrid materials continue to develop and expand into new and exciting nature-inspired self-assembled materials with future applications in catalysis, photocatalysis, and sensors. In particular, in the field of biofuels production using the catalytic liquefaction of biomass, hydrothermal carbons and hybrids with a basic or acid character could play a specific role for various catalytic reactions when used as solid catalysts.