23. Postinduction therapy in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

  1. Ross Pinkerton MB, BCh, BaO, MD Executive Director, Division of Oncology2,
  2. Ananth Shankar MD, FRCPCH Consultant in Paediatric and Adolescent Oncology3 and
  3. Katherine K. Matthay BA, MD Mildred V. Strouss Professor of Translational Oncology, Director, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology4
  1. Ananth Shankar

Published Online: 8 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118625309.ch23

Evidence-Based Pediatric Oncology

Evidence-Based Pediatric Oncology

How to Cite

Shankar, A. (2013) Postinduction therapy in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in Evidence-Based Pediatric Oncology (eds R. Pinkerton, A. Shankar and K. K. Matthay), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford. doi: 10.1002/9781118625309.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Royal Children's Hospital, Children's Health Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

  2. 3

    University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust London, UK

  3. 4

    Department of Pediatrics, UCSF School of Medicine and, UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, San Francisco, CA, USA

Author Information

  1. University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 8 MAY 2013
  2. Published Print: 20 MAY 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470659649

Online ISBN: 9781118625309

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Keywords:

  • acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL);
  • adolescents;
  • children;
  • postinduction therapy

Summary

This chapter discusses two case studies on postinduction therapy in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The first case study is that early post induction intensification therapy improves survival for children and adolescents with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The second case study is that young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia have an excellent outcome with chemotherapy alone and benefit from intensive post induction treatment. As with children, young adults who had rapid early responders (RER) to remission induction treatment benefit from early intensive postinduction therapy but do not benefit from a second interim maintenance and delayed intensification phase. Additionally, these results did not support a role for the routine use of allogeneic bone arrow transplantation in first remission for young adults with ALL.