11. Overview of the Health Properties of Blueberries

  1. Margot Skinner5 and
  2. Denise Hunter6
  1. Carrie M. Elks1,
  2. Joseph Francis2,
  3. April J. Stull3,
  4. William T. Cefalu3,
  5. Barbara Shukitt-Hale4 and
  6. Donald K. Ingram1

Published Online: 24 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118635551.ch11

Bioactives in Fruit: Health Benefits and Functional Foods

Bioactives in Fruit: Health Benefits and Functional Foods

How to Cite

Elks, C. M., Francis, J., Stull, A. J., Cefalu, W. T., Shukitt-Hale, B. and Ingram, D. K. (2013) Overview of the Health Properties of Blueberries, in Bioactives in Fruit: Health Benefits and Functional Foods (eds M. Skinner and D. Hunter), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118635551.ch11

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Professor in Food Science, School of Chemical Sciences and Institute of Plant and Food Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

  2. 6

    Research Scientist in Food Innovation, The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Auckland, New Zealand

Author Information

  1. 1

    Nutritional Neuroscience and Aging Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

  2. 2

    Comparative Biomedical Sciences, Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

  3. 3

    Diabetes and Nutrition Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

  4. 4

    Neuroscience Laboratory, USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 24 JUN 2013
  2. Published Print: 19 JUN 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470674970

Online ISBN: 9781118635551

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • bioactive components;
  • blueberries;
  • cardiovascular disease;
  • diabetes mellitus;
  • gastrointestinal diseases;
  • health benefits;
  • hyperlipidemia;
  • insulin resistance;
  • obesity;
  • polyphenolic compounds

Summary

This chapter highlights the health benefits of blueberries. The blueberry's nutritional value has recently been emphasized, as its polyphenolic compounds can exert benefits to human health. Metabolic syndrome is a pre-diabetic state characterized by phenotypes including insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia, inflammation and obesity, all of which are also risk factors for cardiovascular disease. If left unmanaged, metabolic syndrome can progress to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and lead to cardiovascular disease, both of which remain major public health concerns. Blueberries have emerged as a rich source of bioactive components that offer therapeutic potential for attenuating the progression of several diseases, in addition to having protective effects in the gastrointestinal tract and eye. The principal mechanisms behind these protective effects include potential antioxidant activity and possible attenuation of inflammatory gene expression and oxidative stress.