18. Propionic Acid Fermentation

  1. Shang-Tian Yang1,
  2. Hesham A El-Enshasy2 and
  3. Nuttha Thongchul3
  1. Zhongqiang Wang,
  2. Jianxin Sun,
  3. An Zhang and
  4. Shang-Tian Yang

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch18

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

How to Cite

Wang, Z., Sun, J., Zhang, A. and Yang, S.-T. (2013) Propionic Acid Fermentation, in Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers (eds S.-T. Yang, H. A. El-Enshasy and N. Thongchul), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch18

Editor Information

  1. 1

    William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Institute of Bioproduct Development (IBD), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia

  3. 3

    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470541951

Online ISBN: 9781118642047

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Keywords:

  • fermentation processes;
  • in situ product recovery (ISPR);
  • metabolic engineering;
  • propionibacteria;
  • propionic acid

Summary

Conventional propionic acid fermentation is uneconomical due to low product yield, productivity, and product concentration caused by end-product inhibition. The coproduction of acetic and succinic acids in the fermentation makes downstream processing for product recovery and purification more complicated and costly. Recent research has thus focused on strain development via evolutionary and metabolic engineering and process engineering to improve fermentation performance and lower the production cost. This chapter reviews these research efforts after a brief overview on the general microbiology of propionibacteria. In situ product recovery (ISPR) is a useful method to improve fermentation productivity by continuously removing propionic acid from the fermentation broth to alleviate end-product inhibition. In terms of process engineering, cell recycle and immobilization are promising techniques to achieve high cell density, product titer, productivity, and yield simultaneously while the process can be stably operated for an extended period.