2. The Outlook of Sugar and Starch Crops in Biorefinery

  1. Shang-Tian Yang1,
  2. Hesham A El-Enshasy2 and
  3. Nuttha Thongchul3
  1. Klanarong Sriroth and
  2. Kuakoon Piyachomkwan

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch2

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

How to Cite

Sriroth, K. and Piyachomkwan, K. (2013) The Outlook of Sugar and Starch Crops in Biorefinery, in Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers (eds S.-T. Yang, H. A. El-Enshasy and N. Thongchul), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 1

    William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Institute of Bioproduct Development (IBD), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia

  3. 3

    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470541951

Online ISBN: 9781118642047

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Keywords:

  • biorefinery;
  • starch crops;
  • sugar crops

Summary

Among various plant-derived biomass, starch and sugar crops are recognized as major feedstock for the first generation of biorefinery, whereas lignocellulosic biomass is regarded as the feedstock for the second generation. This chapter reviews primarily aspects of production, processing technology, and uses of industrial sugar and starch crops, as well as the future of these crops for biorefinery. The use of sugar crops (sugar cane, sugar beet, sweet sorghum) as the feedstock in biorefinery has a greater advantage in terms of crop reproduction and the conversion process over the starch crops. The major sources of starch crops for biorefinery include cereal grains (corn, wheat, and rice) and roots and tubers (potato and cassava). Either the use of sugar or starch crops individually can be achieved in biorefinery, but the integration of sugar- and starch-based biorefinery production can significantly improve the overall process economics and commercialization.