20. Production of Citric, Itaconic, Fumaric, and Malic Acids in Filamentous Fungal Fermentations

  1. Shang-Tian Yang1,
  2. Hesham A El-Enshasy2 and
  3. Nuttha Thongchul3
  1. Kun Zhang,
  2. Baohua Zhang and
  3. Shang-Tian Yang

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch20

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

How to Cite

Zhang, K., Zhang, B. and Yang, S.-T. (2013) Production of Citric, Itaconic, Fumaric, and Malic Acids in Filamentous Fungal Fermentations, in Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers (eds S.-T. Yang, H. A. El-Enshasy and N. Thongchul), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch20

Editor Information

  1. 1

    William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Institute of Bioproduct Development (IBD), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia

  3. 3

    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470541951

Online ISBN: 9781118642047

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Keywords:

  • A. terreus;
  • citric acid;
  • filamentous fungal fermentation;
  • fumaric acid;
  • itaconic acid;
  • malic acid

Summary

This chapter focuses on recent advances in bioproduction of citric acid, itaconic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid that are either predominantly or potentially can be produced by filamentous fungi in industrial fermentation. It provides an overview of current situations for these carboxylic acids and their current production methods. The chapter discusses the recent developments concerning microbiology, biochemistry, genetics, and fermentation processes for producing these carboxylic acids by filamentous fungi. The current commercial production of itaconic acid from carbohydrates is also via filamentous fungal fermentation with Aspergillus terreus as the most commonly used species. Finally, the chapter deals with recent advances in novel bioreactors and separation techniques, particularly in situ product removal technology, that offer more efficient fermentation processes for economical production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.