24. Refining Food Processing By-Products for Value-Added Functional Ingredients

  1. Shang-Tian Yang1,
  2. Hesham A El-Enshasy2 and
  3. Nuttha Thongchul3
  1. Kequan Zhou,
  2. Yuting Zhou and
  3. Y. Martin Lo

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch24

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

How to Cite

Zhou, K., Zhou, Y. and Lo, Y. M. (2013) Refining Food Processing By-Products for Value-Added Functional Ingredients, in Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers (eds S.-T. Yang, H. A. El-Enshasy and N. Thongchul), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch24

Editor Information

  1. 1

    William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Institute of Bioproduct Development (IBD), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia

  3. 3

    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470541951

Online ISBN: 9781118642047

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Keywords:

  • anthocyanin;
  • antioxidants;
  • carotenoid pigments;
  • dietary fiber;
  • food colorants;
  • food processing by-products;
  • value added components

Summary

In the last two decades, there have been intensive research activities assessing opportunities to explore vegetable and fruit processing by-products for value-added development. Among the value-added components in food processing products, dietary fiber and antioxidants are of particular interest to food industry because fibers are the most abundant materials in the by-products while natural antioxidants exhibit various health-promoting properties, including anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anticarcinogenic, and antihypertensive activities. This chapter discusses extensively these value added components in fruit and vegetable processing by-products and the recent development for their isolation and/or production. Although plants such as elderberry and chokeberry are cultivated especially for the production of anthocyanin food colorants, food by-products, particularly grape pomace, remains one of the current main sources of anthocyanins.