3. Novel and Traditional Oil Crops and Their Biorefinery Potential

  1. Shang-Tian Yang1,
  2. Hesham A El-Enshasy2 and
  3. Nuttha Thongchul3
  1. Johann Vollmann and
  2. Margit Laimer

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch3

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

How to Cite

Vollmann, J. and Laimer, M. (2013) Novel and Traditional Oil Crops and Their Biorefinery Potential, in Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers (eds S.-T. Yang, H. A. El-Enshasy and N. Thongchul), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch3

Editor Information

  1. 1

    William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Institute of Bioproduct Development (IBD), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia

  3. 3

    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470541951

Online ISBN: 9781118642047

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Keywords:

  • biorefinery potential;
  • novel oil crops;
  • oil crop breeding;
  • traditional oil crops

Summary

This chapter addresses both novel and traditional oil crops selected because of their biorefinery potential. It highlights recent developments in plant breeding and associated biotechnologies related to oil crop production and nonfood utilization. Oil crop breeding is facing various challenges as compared with the improvement of other species: Most oil crops have a shorter cropping history than cereals, legumes, or forage species. Novel oil crops include jatropha, pongamia, lesquerella and cuphea, camelina, and crambe. Traditional oil crops include soybean, oilseed rape, sunflower, linseed (flax), cottonseed, castor bean, and oil palm. In the past, plant breeding and associated biotechnologies have made major contributions to the overall increase of oil crop production and functionality of vegetable oils both for food and nonfood applications. Further growth in production is expected for the near future due to the growing need for vegetable oils in food, feed, biofuels, and oleochemical raw materials.