9. Xylanases: Characteristics, Sources, Production, and Applications

  1. Shang-Tian Yang1,
  2. Hesham A El-Enshasy2 and
  3. Nuttha Thongchul3
  1. Evangelos Topakas,
  2. Gianni Panagiotou and
  3. Paul Christakopoulos

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch9

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers

How to Cite

Topakas, E., Panagiotou, G. and Christakopoulos, P. (2013) Xylanases: Characteristics, Sources, Production, and Applications, in Bioprocessing Technologies in Biorefinery for Sustainable Production of Fuels, Chemicals, and Polymers (eds S.-T. Yang, H. A. El-Enshasy and N. Thongchul), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9781118642047.ch9

Editor Information

  1. 1

    William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

  2. 2

    Institute of Bioproduct Development (IBD), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia

  3. 3

    Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470541951

Online ISBN: 9781118642047

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Keywords:

  • biochemical characteristics;
  • industrial applications;
  • recombinant technology;
  • xylanases

Summary

This chapter reviews the diversity and biochemical characteristics of xylanases, the sources and production of these enzymes using wild-type strains or recombinant technology, and their commercial applications. Complete xylanolytic enzyme systems have been found to be quite widespread among fungi and bacteria. Xylanase activity can be affected by the presence of proteinaceous inhibitors in cereals. The chapter describes representative studies that have been directed toward the improvement of xylanase productivity. These studies cover most of the diverse strategies that can be applied, not only for xylanase production, but for the complete enzymatic machinery that microorganisms possess to “digest” their food. With the advent of technological advancements, the remarkable growth in biotechnological use of xylanases has spurred new interest in industrial enzymes. Market trends reveal that xylanase and cellulase takes the major chunk of share amounting to 20% of the world enzyme market, together with pectinases.