Age of the Black Prince Volcanics in the Central Admiralty Mountains and Possibly Related Hypabyssal Rocks in the Millen Range, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica

  1. Edmund Stump
  1. C. J. Adams1,
  2. P. F. Whitla1,
  3. R. H. Findlay2 and
  4. B. F. Field3

Published Online: 16 MAR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118664957.ch8

Geological Investigations in Northern Victoria Land

Geological Investigations in Northern Victoria Land

How to Cite

Adams, C. J., Whitla, P. F., Findlay, R. H. and Field, B. F. (1986) Age of the Black Prince Volcanics in the Central Admiralty Mountains and Possibly Related Hypabyssal Rocks in the Millen Range, Northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, in Geological Investigations in Northern Victoria Land (ed E. Stump), American Geophysical Union, Washington, D. C.. doi: 10.1002/9781118664957.ch8

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Department Of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lower Hutt, New Zealand

  2. 2

    Department of Geology, University Of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

  3. 3

    New Zealand Geological Survey, Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Christchurch, New Zealand

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 16 MAR 2013
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1986

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780875901978

Online ISBN: 9781118664957

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Keywords:

  • Geology—Antarctic regions—Victoria Land

Summary

Potassium-argon (K-Ar) total-rock ages are reported for two andesites at Mount Black Prince (Admiralty Mountains) and five andesite-rhyodacite dikes, one from the Admiralty Mountains and four from the Millen Range, in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica. Five of the ages determined, including those of the Black Prince flows, are in the range 323–382 Ma; the other results are 300 Ma and 307 Ma. The older ages in the range 350–382 Ma are a minimum estimate for the Black Prince Volcanics and associated intrusives and confirm the mid-Devonian to early Carboniferous age deduced from plant fossils in intercalated volcaniclastic sediments. The volcanics may be part of the igneous cycle that produced widespread granite plutons in this region during the period late Devonian to early Carboniferous.