10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Animal Manures and Technologies for Their Reduction

  1. Sven G. Sommer5,
  2. Morten L. Christensen6,
  3. Thomas Schmidt7 and
  4. Lars S. Jensen8
  1. Sven G. Sommer1,
  2. Tim J. Clough2,
  3. David Chadwick3 and
  4. Søren O. Petersen4

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118676677.ch10

Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management

Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management

How to Cite

Sommer, S. G., Clough, T. J., Chadwick, D. and Petersen, S. O. (2013) Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Animal Manures and Technologies for Their Reduction, in Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management (eds S. G. Sommer, M. L. Christensen, T. Schmidt and L. S. Jensen), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118676677.ch10

Editor Information

  1. 5

    Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

  2. 6

    Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark

  3. 7

    Technology Transfer Office, Aarhus University, Denmark

  4. 8

    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

  2. 2

    Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, New Zealand

  3. 3

    School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor University, Environment Centre for Wales, UK

  4. 4

    Department of Agroecology, Aarhus University, Denmark

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 9 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118488539

Online ISBN: 9781118676677

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Keywords:

  • nitrous oxide;
  • methane;
  • biogas;
  • acidification;
  • additives;
  • manure

Summary

The intensification of livestock production has led to increasing volumes of manure to be managed on the farm. Livestock manure is rich in carbon, nitrogen and water, and manure environments therefore have the potential for emission of the greenhouse gases (GHG) methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Methane is produced in strictly anaerobic environments, while N2O is produced in environments with low or fluctuating oxygen availability. Both GHGs can be produced and emitted to the atmosphere from each stage of the manure management chain, but the potential for emissions will depend on manure composition, oxygen availability and temperature. This chapter describes management factors affecting emissions of CH4 and N2O at different stages of the “manure management continuum”, and how handling and treatment technologies can influence emissions at one stage, but also emissions at subsequent stages. Emissions factors for CH4 and N2O at the different stages of solid and liquid manure management are presented, and methods to reduce the emissions are described.