14. Animal Manure Residue Upgrading and Nutrient Recovery in Biofertilisers

  1. Sven G. Sommer2,
  2. Morten L. Christensen3,
  3. Thomas Schmidt4 and
  4. Lars S. Jensen5
  1. Lars S. Jensen

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118676677.ch14

Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management

Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management

How to Cite

Jensen, L. S. (2013) Animal Manure Residue Upgrading and Nutrient Recovery in Biofertilisers, in Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management (eds S. G. Sommer, M. L. Christensen, T. Schmidt and L. S. Jensen), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118676677.ch14

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

  2. 3

    Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark

  3. 4

    Technology Transfer Office, Aarhus University, Denmark

  4. 5

    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Author Information

  1. Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 9 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118488539

Online ISBN: 9781118676677

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Keywords:

  • compost;
  • manure pellets;
  • ash;
  • ash extraction;
  • biochar;
  • struvite;
  • mineral concentrates

Summary

This chapter describes the different existing and new promising options for recovering and upgrading manure nutrients and organic matter, and the properties and effectiveness of the biofertilisers produced. Composting of manure solids is described in some detail, since this is one of the dominant technologies currently applied. It reduces volume, mass, odour and pathogens, and enables more distant export for soil fertility maintenance in regions of poor soil quality, but also with potential markets in the non-agricultural sector (landscaping, topsoil, growing media). Manure combustion or gasification for energy production leads to an ash byproduct, which can function as a slow-release potassium or phosphorus fertiliser. However, the ash can also be subjected to chemical extraction or conversion to obtain soluble mineral fertilisers. Pyrolysis of manures for production of biochar-based biofertiliser is an emerging technology, as is precipitation of struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) and high-tech reverse osmosis or ultrafiltration, producing mineral concentrates of high potential fertiliser value.