7. Solid–Liquid Separation of Animal Slurry

  1. Sven G. Sommer3,
  2. Morten L. Christensen4,
  3. Thomas Schmidt5 and
  4. Lars S. Jensen6
  1. Morten L. Christensen1,
  2. Knud V. Christensen2 and
  3. Sven G. Sommer2

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118676677.ch7

Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management

Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management

How to Cite

Christensen, M. L., Christensen, K. V. and Sommer, S. G. (2013) Solid–Liquid Separation of Animal Slurry, in Animal Manure Recycling: Treatment and Management (eds S. G. Sommer, M. L. Christensen, T. Schmidt and L. S. Jensen), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118676677.ch7

Editor Information

  1. 3

    Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

  2. 4

    Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark

  3. 5

    Technology Transfer Office, Aarhus University, Denmark

  4. 6

    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark

  2. 2

    Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 9 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781118488539

Online ISBN: 9781118676677

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Keywords:

  • manure;
  • slurry;
  • plant nutrients;
  • mechanical separation;
  • membranes;
  • additives

Summary

Intensive and large-scale livestock production units produce considerable amounts of manure containing plant nutrients and organic matter. Due to intensification of production, a surplus of plant nutrients may accumulate on these farms and risks being discharged or emitted to the environment. Much manure is managed on farms as slurry with a high water content, but surplus manure transport away from farms is expensive. To support a better match of manure plant nutrients and the nutrient requirements of the crops on the farm, separation techniques have been developed to reduce the nutrient content of slurry used on-farm and to facilitate cheap transport of the surplus plant nutrients from the farm in the form of a small solid fraction with a higher concentration of nutrients. The principle of separation of slurry is described for organic matter, recovery of plant nutrients and reuse of water. The efficiency of the different technologies is presented.