15. Epidemiology, Progression, Prognosis, and Comorbidity of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias

  1. Matthew S. Robbins MD,
  2. Brian M. Grosberg MD and
  3. Richard B. Lipton MD
  1. Matthew S. Robbins1 and
  2. Jessica Ailani2

Published Online: 19 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118678961.ch15

Headache

Headache

How to Cite

Robbins, M. S. and Ailani, J. (2013) Epidemiology, Progression, Prognosis, and Comorbidity of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias, in Headache (eds M. S. Robbins, B. M. Grosberg and R. B. Lipton), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118678961.ch15

Editor Information

  1. Montefi ore Headache Center, Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA

Author Information

  1. 1

    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA

  2. 2

    Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 19 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 30 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470654729

Online ISBN: 9781118678961

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Keywords:

  • Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias;
  • cluster headache;
  • paroxysmal hemicrania;
  • short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing;
  • prevalence;
  • incidence;
  • gender ratio;
  • progression

Summary

The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of 3 primary headache disorders that all feature repetitive, short duration attacks of unilateral head pain in the distribution of the first division of the trigeminal nerve, accompanied by ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. The TACs are a rare group of headache disorders in any population. In this chapter, we will briefly describe the clinical features of cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing, and then focus on their epidemiological characteristics, including comorbidity and progression.