12. Indigenous Rights, Conservation, and Climate Change Strategies in Guyana

  1. Peter H. Raven2,
  2. Navjot S. Sodhi3 and
  3. Luke Gibson3
  1. Michelle Kalamandeen

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch12

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

How to Cite

Kalamandeen, M. (2013) Indigenous Rights, Conservation, and Climate Change Strategies in Guyana, in Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics (eds P. H. Raven, N. S. Sodhi and L. Gibson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch12

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Missouri Botanical Garden

  2. 3

    National University of Singapore

Author Information

  1. Department of Biology, University of Guyana, Georgetown, Guyana

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658635

Online ISBN: 9781118679838

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Keywords:

  • climate change;
  • conservation;
  • Guyana;
  • indigenous rights;
  • low carbon development strategy (LCDS)

Summary

This paper examines how Guyana, a small South American country with relatively large intact rainforests, is coping with the matter of indigenous rights in protected areas generally, and in the implementation of the nation's recently initiated low carbon development strategy (LCDS). There are many ways in which indigenous communities can suffer consequences associated with climate change itself. The important point for discussion centers on the interpretation of autonomy, including what such a definition would mean in practice. Conservation actions have helped communities protect their watershed, sustain healthy populations of hunted species, and protect traditional sources of medicine. Utilizing a rights‐based approach to conservation and climate change ensures that the strategies employed do not come at the expense of indigenous rights.