2. Conservation Paradigms Seen through the Eyes of Bonobos in the Democratic Republic of Congo

  1. Peter H. Raven2,
  2. Navjot S. Sodhi3 and
  3. Luke Gibson3
  1. Bila-Isia Inogwabini and
  2. Nigel Leader-Williams

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch2

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

How to Cite

Inogwabini, B.-I. and Leader-Williams, N. (2013) Conservation Paradigms Seen through the Eyes of Bonobos in the Democratic Republic of Congo, in Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics (eds P. H. Raven, N. S. Sodhi and L. Gibson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch2

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Missouri Botanical Garden

  2. 3

    National University of Singapore

Author Information

  1. Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658635

Online ISBN: 9781118679838

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • apes;
  • bonobos;
  • Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC);
  • wildlife conservation paradigms

Summary

Bonobos are the most recently discovered species of great apes, and are endemic to an area within a large convex bend of the Congo River, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). This chapter highlights issues related to the discovery for science of a significant population of bonobos to the west of their range, lying some 100 km outside the boundary of the nearest statutory protected area. This discovery is used to compare two opposing conservation paradigms: protected areas as a backbone of species and habitat conservation versus more inclusive conservation models that embrace community‐managed conservation areas. The key conservation dilemma that the chapter addresses is why bonobos occur at higher densities in unprotected areas that have long been considered marginal habitats, while habitats previously thought to have been optimal, including areas that are formally protected, have failed to meet their conservation goals for bonobos.