21. Biodiversity and Conservation in the Pacific Islands: Why Are We Not Succeeding?

  1. Peter H. Raven4,
  2. Navjot S. Sodhi5 and
  3. Luke Gibson5
  1. Gilianne Brodie1,
  2. Patrick Pikacha2 and
  3. Marika Tuiwawa3

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch21

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

How to Cite

Brodie, G., Pikacha, P. and Tuiwawa, M. (2013) Biodiversity and Conservation in the Pacific Islands: Why Are We Not Succeeding?, in Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics (eds P. H. Raven, N. S. Sodhi and L. Gibson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch21

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Missouri Botanical Garden

  2. 5

    National University of Singapore

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji Islands

  2. 2

    Solomon Islands Community Conservation Partnership, Honiara, Solomon Islands

  3. 3

    South Pacific Regional Herbarium, University of the South Pacific, Suva, Fiji Islands

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658635

Online ISBN: 9781118679838

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • biodiversity;
  • conservation;
  • ecosystem changes;
  • human behavior;
  • Pacific Island

Summary

There are more than 25,000 relatively small islands located in the Pacific region. The flora and fauna of these islands are highly diverse, and many of the species that occur in the region have limited ranges and are not found elsewhere in the world. Many of the human‐induced ecosystem changes currently occurring on these fragile islands are irreversible; they often relate to changes in community values and beliefs as well as the growing desire for income generation. Simply knowing the facts will not lead to the conservation of biotas, however. What we need is a change in human behavior at the community, business, and political level. The loss of ecosystem function and biodiversity often results in diminished contributions to human livelihoods.