23. The Chimera of Conservation in Papua New Guinea and the Challenge of Changing Trajectories

  1. Peter H. Raven2,
  2. Navjot S. Sodhi3 and
  3. Luke Gibson3
  1. Phil Shearman

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch23

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

How to Cite

Shearman, P. (2013) The Chimera of Conservation in Papua New Guinea and the Challenge of Changing Trajectories, in Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics (eds P. H. Raven, N. S. Sodhi and L. Gibson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch23

Editor Information

  1. 2

    Missouri Botanical Garden

  2. 3

    National University of Singapore

Author Information

  1. University of Papua New Guinea, Papua New Guinea

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658635

Online ISBN: 9781118679838

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Keywords:

  • biotic diversity;
  • conservation;
  • environment;
  • mining industry;
  • Papua New Guinea (PNG)

Summary

Papua New Guinea (PNG) has a massive biotic diversity that has originated as a product of a series of mountain‐building events and island arcs speciations sandwiched sequentially onto the main islands. While some of the largest river systems have been polluted by the spoils of the mining industry, most of the smaller rivers remain undammed and clean. The current trajectory of ever more mines, logging concessions, and speculative opportunism coupled with greater efficiency in stealing is a tragedy that could have been avoided, and maybe still can. PNG is rich enough to not have to make the same choices that other less fortunate countries have had to make‐it could keep most of its environments intact and have a decent quality of life for its people, but it desperately needs new leaders who can set a course for a different horizon without personal enrichment as their primary objective.