27. People, Plants and Pollinators: Uniting Conservation, Food Security, and Sustainable Agriculture in East Africa

  1. Peter H. Raven4,
  2. Navjot S. Sodhi5 and
  3. Luke Gibson5
  1. Dino J. Martins

Published Online: 12 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch27

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics

How to Cite

Martins, D. J. (2013) People, Plants and Pollinators: Uniting Conservation, Food Security, and Sustainable Agriculture in East Africa, in Conservation Biology : Voices from the Tropics (eds P. H. Raven, N. S. Sodhi and L. Gibson), John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Oxford, UK. doi: 10.1002/9781118679838.ch27

Editor Information

  1. 4

    Missouri Botanical Garden

  2. 5

    National University of Singapore

Author Information

  1. Insect Committee of Nature Kenya, The East Africa Natural History Society, Nairobi, Kenya

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 12 JUL 2013
  2. Published Print: 16 SEP 2013

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470658635

Online ISBN: 9781118679838

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Keywords:

  • conservation;
  • East Africa;
  • food security;
  • natural habitat;
  • pollinators;
  • rural farmers;
  • sustainable agriculture

Summary

In developing regions like Eastern Africa, pollinators are primarily wild insects that travel between farms and natural habitat, and are extremely vulnerable to habitat loss and destruction. Pollinators make a direct connection between wild species and food security. This chapter highlights some case studies showing the links between wild pollinators, natural habitat, and rural farmers. Saving pollinators justifies the conservation of small species‐rich habitats, such as forest patches, because of their contribution to food security and rural livelihoods of the communities around them. Studies in East Africa at several different sites have revealed that wild insect pollinators are an important component of subsistence agriculture by providing pollination services to farms. Saving small patches of habitat and increasing the understanding and appreciation of pollinators represent direct ways of improving food security and alleviating poverty through increased crop yields.